Tag Archives: diet

Spring Cleaning: The Seven Must-Dos of Any Detox

Ah, spring. Something about the season just makes you want to clear out the junk and start fresh, doesn’t it? Spring is traditionally a time of renewal, rejuvenation and rebirth. So it’s no coincidence this is the time of year we go into hyper-cleaning mode and want to get rid of all the dust and stuff that we’ve accumulated over the past year. And I’m not just talking about your closet…

Just like dirt and clutter accumulate around the house, mucus, toxins and fat accumulate in the body. And every so often it’s necessary to do a little tidying up to keep the body clean and functioning properly. If not, the junk builds up and can lead to all sorts of health problems from allergies to serious disease.

Your body has everything it needs to properly cleanse itself from the inside out. It’s just matter of allowing it to do its thing. There are hundreds of different approaches out there to detoxing and cleansing. Which technique is the best? The one you’ll stick with. No matter which road you take though, there are a few “must-dos” that are essential for any good cleanse. Get the info in my guest post on Glass Heel today. Hop on over for my seven detox essentials.

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Lessons From a Caveman: The Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Cavemen had it easy. They didn’t have the temptation of sweet potato fries, or Dairy Queen Blizzards, or margaritas. All they had to eat were nuts, berries and seeds; lean meat; fish and plant foods. Their primitive diet struck the perfect balance of anti-inflammatory Omega-3s and pro-inflammatory Omega-6s. What does today’s “caveman” diet look like? Steak. Potato. Bread. The scales are tipped in one clear direction. In a span of a few hundred-thousand years, from hunting and gathering to the fast food industry, our pro to anti-inflammation ratio has gone from 1:1 to a bloated 30:1. Say, “Do I look swollen?”

It might be another story if McDonald’s got its start selling salmon and spinach Happy Meals. But the reality is most of the foods and fast food we eat are processed and fatty. And the more we eat, the more inflammation builds up in the body. It’s what causes aches and pains and leads to allergies, asthma, autoimmune diseases, heart disease and Alzheimer’s. Of course inflammation speeds up the aging process in general too. Hello, wrinkles. So when you hear of the powerful antioxidents in blueberries, or the wonders of green tea, or the new superfood – acai, or whatever is touted as the next season’s fountain of youth …  it all comes down to the food’s ability to fight inflammation.

The trick is to eat less of the really pro-inflammatory stuff (processed foods, sugar, red meat…) and more of the anti-inflammatory stuff (veggies, nuts, fish, whole grains…). Go primitive. In your diet that is. No loin clothes.
I like to think that if I can strike a balance, I’m in good shape. The good cancels out the bad, right? Do the math: 1 Butterfinger Blizzard + 6 oz. salmon + 1 Spinach salad + 1/4 cup blueberries = 0. That’s a wash. 

Here’s a quick list of some inflammation fighters:
nuts (almonds, walnuts, cashews)
avocados
fish (wild-caught salmon)
olive oil
dark leafy greens (spinach, mixed greens)
whole grains (brown rice)
broccoli/cauliflower
berries (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries)
tomatoes
tea (green)

And some inflammation instigators:
butter/margarine
sugar
full-fat dairy
red meat
high-fructose corn syrup
vegetable oils (corn, cottonseed, safflower and sunflower oils)
wheat flour (white bread)
packaged snack foods
coffee

For a visual, check out Dr. Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid.

Want more? Read: Jack Challem’s “The Inflammation Syndrome”

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Case of the Mondays?

Word is that fatty foods make you run slower and forget things. A new study found that after just a few days on a high fat diet, rats had more trouble getting to the end of a maze and spun their exercise wheels 30 percent slower. That means just a few days of sin (a.k.a. my weekend) can affect short-term memory and energy level. This brings a whole new understanding to that “Case of the Mondays.”

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